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I agree with almost everything here, except that it's not the case that "everyone writes", is it? Everyone could write, but only a few do. According to Wikipedia itself, about 27,000 authors make five or more edits each month. As a proportion of the millions (or tens of millions?) who use Wikipedia a month, that's probably less than 1% of everyone.

Is this 1% just the committed net citizens who buy into wiki culture? When 60% of the world's population is online, will 1% of them still write for Wikipedia? If it's much lower than that, will it matter? What happens if the committed few lose energy after the first decade of Wikipedia? Could it just become a platform for vanity publishing?

I don't have answers to any of these questions, but it seems to me that it's too soon to announce the triumph of Wikipedia as anything more than an 'interim' wonder of the web so far.

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